8.9 – Non-Fiction Stories

Level 1-4 Evaluation

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 

CASI Expectations

  • Carefully read the main story, sidebars and photo captions.
  • Answer questions 1, 2, 3a, 3c, 3d, 4 and 5. 

Summary Success Criteria

– Begin with the retell sentence starter: This non-fiction text is about …

– Select the four to five of the most important details in the text.

– Continue with the relate sentence starter: This text reminds me of …

– Make a text to text or text to self, text to text or text to world connection. Explain your connection using words, such as similar, reminds, connects to and just like.

Main Idea Success Criteria (Hint this should be shorter than your summary)

– Begin with the reflect sentence starter: This text is important because …

– Make an inference and explain in your own words with supporting details why this story is important.

– Continue with the respect sentence starter: I have a new understanding of …

– Identify the most important new information you have learned from this text and how it will benefit your life.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 

Daily Edit: the Em Dash

until 8000 years ago, wild horses roamed across much of north america. no one really knows why they died out — perhaps it was climate change, or maybe they were hunted to extinction by early Humans — but Horses were not seen again in the americas until the late 15th century.

Em Dash — They are used to surround an explanation that has been inserted in the sentence and are also used as a dramatic pause — if you smell what the Rock is cooking.

dashes

Read Aloud

  • Jean Little: Mine for Keeps

With your Learning Partner:

1) In your own words, summarize the article, Mine for Keeps.

Summary Success Criteria

– Begin with the retell sentence starter: This non-fiction text is about …

– Select the four to five of the most important details in the text.

– Continue with the relate sentence starter: This text reminds me of …

– Make a text to text or text to self, text to text or text to world connection. Explain your connection using words, such as similar, reminds, connects to and just like.

Main Idea Success Criteria

– Begin with the reflect sentence starter: This story is important because …

– Make an inference and explain with supporting details why Jean Little’s life story is important for people to read.

– Continue with the respect sentence starter: I have a new understanding of …

– Identify the most important new information you have learned from this text.

 

Level 4 Example: This non-fiction text is about the story of a brave and courageous woman named Jean Little who was born with a vision-related disability. She refused to let her disability get in her way and learned to read, go to school and play with other children. As she got older, her eyesight became worse, but her perseverance became greater. She attended university and graduated at the top of her class. Later, she pursued her love and talent of writing and is now — with the help of a seeing eye dog and a talking computer — one of Canada’s most celebrated authors. Jean Little’s story reminds of a girl named Carly Fleischmann, a young Toronto writer who was born with autism and an oral motor condition. Similar to Jean, Carly uses computer technology to write and publish her books, including her autobiography, Carly’s Voice. Carly also uses her computer to speak.

2) What is the main idea of this article?

Success Criteria

– Begin with the reflect sentence starter: This story is important because …

– Make an inference and explain with supporting details why Jean Little’s life story is important for people to read.

– Continue with the respect sentence starter: I have a new understanding of …

– Identify the most important new information you have learned from this text.

Level 4 Example: This non-fiction text is important because it shows that even if you have a disability, you can still lead a normal life, or a life as close to normal as possible. This biography will also raise the self-confidence in children with and without disabilities. I have a new understanding of how modern technology is capable of accommodating to people with disabilities and allow them to achieve in success in a variety of ways, including writing and publishing novels.

Thursday, May 16, 2013 

Effective Strategies for Making Inferences

  1. Look for clues that the author gives you in the text.
  2. Think about what you already know about the topic.
  3. Think about your own experiences.
  4. Put your own experiences together with clues from the text.
  5. Come up with your own idea or conclusion about the text that is not told to you in the author’s words.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013 

Making Inferences and Providing Evidence to Support Inferences About Non-Fiction Texts

What do we mean by “Inference?”

Sometimes someone will try and tell you something without coming right out and saying it. They will imply it. When you understand what is being implied, you infer the meaning. Sometimes you can infer the truth when the writer isn’t trying to be helpful with the information that they’re giving you. This is called reading between the lines.

Thursday, May 9, 2013 

Features of Non-Fiction Texts

  1. Subheadings: These provide more detail about a non-fiction text than the story’s  main headline. Effective subheadings represent distinct aspects of a text.
  2. Illustrations with Captions: photographs, illustrations, graphs, graphics and maps are used alongside non-fiction texts  to help present complex information aswell as add interest to the story. Captions describe what is featured in the illustration.
  3. Sidebars: A sidebar story often accompanies  news story or non-fiction text.  A sidebar focuses on one particular aspect of the non-fiction text.

TASK

  1. Review the  summary (relate +retell) you wrote on earlier this week. On a Sticky Note, identify two strengths of your summary and two next steps.
  2. Write a summary response to: “Man charged in decade-long kidnapping, rape women” on page 12.
  3. Be sure to apply your next steps in your new summary.

**********

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Summary of TDSB taking money from needy: Report

This story is about how the TDSB was given $128 million to help low income families, single parent households, parents with less formal education, but instead the TDSB only used $40 million from that $128 million and used the rest on teacher pay rolls. The story reminds me of a time when my mother asked me to go to the grocery store for her to get her milk and bread and gave me $30 but I got a chocolate bar as well And didn’t tell my mom.

Strengths

  • Uses a retell sentence starter.
  • References specific information from the beginning of the text.
  • Uses a relate sentence starter.
  • Makes a relevant  text-to-self connection.

Next Steps

  • Also, include information about the TDSB’s reaction. The summary only references reports accusations, which is potentially a biased point of view.
  • Attempt to also make a text-to-text or text-to-world connection, this will help elevate your response to a level 3 to 4.

TASK

  1. Review the  summary (relate +retell) you wrote on Monday. On a Sticky Note, identify two strengths of your summary and two next steps.
  2. Write a revised response of Monday’s  summary, or write a new summary response to a story in today’s newspaper.

 

Thursday,  May 2, 2013 

Writing Tool #2: Activate Your Verbs

“Never use the passive where you can use the active.” — George Orwell

Active Verb Sentence:  The subject performs the verb in an active verb sentence.  An active verbs sentence can be written in past and future tense.

Examples of active verb sentences:

  • Tyri climbed the stairs, knocked on the door and waited until Mr. Wass let him into the classroom. 
  • Futian destroys Mr. Wass in chess.

Linking Verb Sentence: A verb that is neither active or passive is a linking verb, a form of the verb to be. For example the verbs: am, are, is, was, were, be, being, been and will are all used as linking verbs.

Examples of linking verb sentences:

  • Mr. Wass was listening to classical music.
  • Fariha is dancing in the hallway.

Let’s change the above sentences to Active Verb Sentences

  • Mr. Wass listened to classical music.
  • Fariha dances in the hallway.

Task:

  • Read through today’s Metro newspaper and write down five examples of Active Verb Sentences in your Language notebook.
  • Find three examples of Linking Verb Sentences in today’s Metro newspaper. Write them down and then change them to Active Verbs.

Format:

Active Verbs

1) A man eyes an image of a city sewer.

Linking Verbs to Active Verbs

1) Linking: Zach Braff has made a name for himself in Hollywood.
Active: Zach Braff made a name for himself in Hollywood.

Monday,  April 30, 2013

Writing Tool #1: Right-Branching Students

Subject: A person or thing that is being discussed, described, or dealt with.

Verb: A word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence. Verbs are typically known as action words.

Right Branching Sentence: A sentence with a subject and verb at the beginning, followed by other subordinate elements. The subject and verb join on the left while all other elements branch to the right.

Examples of right branching sentences:

  • Brittany reads in class.
  • Steven writes the math test.
  • Tyri dribbles the basketball outside.

Task:

– With a partner, read through today’s Metro newspaper and underline 10 examples of Right Branching Sentences. Afterward, write the 10 examples down in your Language notebook.

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