Daily Math Work

Math Notebook and Math Journal
Success Criteria:

  • Title, underline your title, and date each new lesson/page;
  • ALWAYS use a pencil to record lessons, and complete math work;
  • Be neat … you need to be able to read your work to help you study for test/quizzes;
  • Record page numbers and questions numbers of math homework on the top right of a new page;
  • Use both sides of the notebook and journal pages;
  • SHOW ALL OF YOUR WORK/STEPS IN YOUR SOLUTIONS;
  • Any work missed due to absences is expected to be completed (unless arrangements made with Mr. Wass).

How are all math units assessed?

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Math Unit 3: Two-Dimensional Geometry

During this unit students will be:

  • Sorting and classifying triangles and quadrilaterals by geometric properties.
  • Comparing similar and congruent shapes.
  • Determining and applying the Pythagorean relationship geometrically.

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*You will be working on this  problem solving question in groups of three. There will be three roles in the group: material organizer, primary scriber and primary presenter.

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

Calculating Area of Parallelogram, Triangle and Trapezoid

Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017

Creating a Pythagorean Calculator on Scratch

Pythagorean Calculator: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/192472926/

Area of a Triangle Calculator: LINK

Task: 

  1. Your task is to follow the instructions from the below video and create the same Pythagorean Calculator as the one Mr. Wass created (see above link).
  2. Next, you will be coding an “Area of a Triangle Calculator.”

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Friday, Dec. 8, 2017

Pythagorean Problem Solving

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*Note: Write the below important notes into your math journal. Include diagram.

Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017

Pythagorean Relationship Terms

Pythagorean Theorem: a2+ b2 = c2
Legs: The two shorter sides of a right angle triangle. Legs meet at 90 degrees

Hypotenuse: Longest side of a right triangle. Located opposite the right angle.
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Below will be completed in math groups of three.

*Complete below in your math notebook.

Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017

Daily Math Questions

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*Note: Write the below important notes into your math journal. Include diagrams.

Monday, Dec. 4, 2017

Classifying Triangles

Triangles can be classified according to the lengths of their sides as well as the types of angles they contain.
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Perimeter: The perimeter of a shape is the distance around the outside.

Area: The area is the number of square units of space covered.

Square and Square Root: The square of a number is calculated by multiplying the number by itself. Reversing the process is called the square root.

*NOTE: Complete below questions in your math notebook.

Monday, Dec. 4, 2017

Intro to New Unit

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Math Unit 3: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying and Dividing Fractions

During this unit students will be:

  • Multiplying and dividing fractions and integers; adding and subtracting fractions.
  • Below are the terms you will need to know during this unit.

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Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Fractions Test Review – Part 2

*Note: Complete below questions in your math notebook.

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*NOTE: The below two problem solving questions must contain the following (remember your math journal and notebook are being evaluated tomorrow):

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

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Monday, November 27, 2017

Addition and Subtraction: To add or subtract mixed numbers, you can change the mixed numbers to improper fractions first or you can use the mixed numbers to solve.

Multiplication and Division: To multiply or divide mixed numbers, change the mixed numbers to improper fractions before solving.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Fractions Test Review

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You will be working on this  problem solving question in groups of three.

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

Thursday, November 23, 2017

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Multiplying Fractions

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*Note: Write the below important notes into your math journal.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Multiplying Fractions: Important Notes

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Small Group Problem Solving

You will be working on this  problem solving question in groups of three.

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

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Note: Record the below question in your math notebook. How many different ways can you solve it?

Monday, November 13, 2017

Intro to Prime Factorization 

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*Note: Write the below definitions into your math journal.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Prime Factorization: The representation of a composite number as the product of its prime factors; for example, the prime factorization of 24 is 24= 2 x 2 x 2 x 3. Usually, the prime numbers are written in order from least to greatest.

Composite Number: a number that has factors other than 1 and itself. 8 has four factors: 1, 2, 4, 8.

Prime Number: a number with exactly two different factors, 1 and itself. 3 is a prime number with factors 1 and 3

Factor Tree: a diagram used to factor a number into its prime factors.

Least Common Multiple (LCM): the least whole number that has two or more given numbers as factors. For example, 12 is the least common multiple of 4 and 6.

Lowest Common Denominator (LCD): The lowest common multiple of the denominators of two or more fractions.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Prime Factorization Homework

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Prime Factorization

Least Common Multiple

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Math Unit 2: 3-D Geometry and Measurement

During this unit students will:

Develop and apply the formula for the volume of a prism; determine and apply surface-area relationships for prisms; develop circumference and area relationships for a circle; develop and apply the formula for the volume of a cylinder; determine and apply surface-area relationships for cylinders.

How you will be assessed during this unit

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Cylinder: Surface Area and Volume

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*Note: Write the below formulas and diagrams in your math journal.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Important Circle Definitions and Terms

1

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Formula for Surface Area of Circle:
SA = area of base and top + area of a curved surface

surface-area-cylinder

*NOTE: Write in your math notebook.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Surface Area of a Cylinder

  1. (write the full SA formula, show your steps, draw a diagram and solve)

121

1

Surface Area Homework

 (write the full SA formula, show your steps, draw a diagram for each solution)

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Volume Review

Question: Which has the greater volume?
  • A piece of paper rolled into a cylinder lengthwise, or
  • the same piece of paper rolled into a cylinder width wise?

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Monday, November 6, 2017

Problem Solving Question of the day

Which of the three hallow three-dimensional figures can hold the most M and M’s?

You will be working on this  problem solving question in groups of three.

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

1

*Note: Record the following (including the diagram) in your math journal.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Measurement of Circles

  1. Radius: a line segment that goes from the centre of a circle to its circumference.
  2. Diameter: a line segment that runs from one side of a circle.
  3. Circumference: the boundary of a circle
  4.  = 3.14

  5. Volume of a cylinder: V = area of base X height.

Formula for Calculating the Area of Circle:

Formula for Finding a Circumference:

C = 2r  and  C = d

Homework

2

HOW TO CONVERT CUBED CM TO MILLITRES

3

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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Triangular Prism Test Preparation

Note: Answer the following questions in from the Math Makes Sense 8 Text Book. Solutions will go in your math notebook. Journals and notebooks will be assessed tomorrow.

  • Read page 124 (you need to know these formulas).
  • Page 125: answer questions 4 and 5. Write the formula first and then show each step of your solution.
  • Page 126: question 6 and 9a). Full problem solving solutions.
  • Page 127: Question 2. Full problem solving solution.

Monday, October 30, 2017

Triangular Prism Problem Solving

The measurements for the Toblerone Bar are: Base = 4 cm; Height = 3 cm; Length = 21 cm

Question: The foil used to wrap the Toblerone bar cost 0.08 cents for each square centrimetre and the cardboard for the outside package cost 0.12 cents per square centrimetre. Find the total cost of the packaging for a crate of 15 dozen bars.

BONUS: Calculate the Volume of the Toblerone bar.

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

Homework

Instructions: Solve the below problem solving questions in your math notebook. While answering the questions, remember to:

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

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Thursday, October 26, 2017

Triangular Prism Problem Solving

Instructions: Each table group will solve the both of the below problem solving questions on chart paper. While answering both questions, remember to:

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

*You will have until 9:10 to complete both questions.

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Thursday, October 26, 2017

Triangular Prisms: Volume and Surface Area

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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Finding the volume for triangular prisms

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Monday, October 23, 2017

Volume: is a measure of the amount of space occupied. It is a three-dimensional concept and so its units are cubic units.

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Volume formula:  the volume of a triangular prism is V= area of base x height.

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In Class Instructions: During today’s in class work,  your group will be answering the problem solving math questions on chart paper in your desk groups.

Remember:

  • Begin with a “To determine … I will …” statement.
  • Solve the problem with numbers, diagrams and words.
  • Conclude with a “Therefore” statement.
  • Make sure your question is organized and easy to read.

*Note: Complete the below questions in your math notebook. Remember to show each step in your calculation. Do not just write down the answer.

Monday, October 23, 2017

Volume of a Triangular Prism

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Monday, October 16, 2017

Applying the Formula for the Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

Formula: SA = al + bl + cl + 2  x 1/2 x bh

The surface area of a triangular prism is the sum of the areas of its faces.

A triangular prism has two congruent triangular faces and three rectangular faces.The two triangular faces are often called the bases, even though they may not be horizontal.

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Class Discussion Question: What does l equal in Example 1?

*Answer the below questions in your math notebook.

Monday, October 16, 2017

Applying the Formula for the Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

Note: Remember to include a “To determine … I will …” and “Therefore” statements while responding to every question. Also, include diagrams and full solutions.

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*Answer the below question in your math journal.

Monday, Oct. 16, 2017

Math Journal Reflection

  1. Describe the differences and similarities between an equilateral, isosceles and scalene triangle.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

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Friday, October 13, 2017

Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

Copy this formula in your math notebook.

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  • Read pages 112 to 114 in MMS 8 textbook.
  • Complete questions 1, 2 and 3 on page 115 (questions are listed below). You need to show all your steps. DO NOT JUST RECORD YOUR ANSWERS. 

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Online assistance below:

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Skeleton:  A skeleton is a frame formed by joining the edges of a three- dimension a figure.

Kinaesthetic Learning Activity 

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*Answer question 6 and 7 in your math notebook.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

3D Figures: Skeletons

*NOTE: Draw a Venn diagram in your math journal. Next, record the below question in your math journal. After that you will answer the question by completing the Venn diagram.

1) Compare nets and skeletons. How are they alike? How are they different?

*NOTE: Record the following in your math journal

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Vocabulary of Three-Dimensional Figures

Mathematicians describe three-dimensional figures in terms of their faces, edges and vertices.

Prisms have a base and a top face that are congruent and parallel. Their other faces are all rectangles

Pyramids have one polygon base and their other faces are all triangles.

Net: a single pattern piece that can be folded to form a three-dimensional figure.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Drawing Nets of Three-Dimensional Figures

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This chart may be useful

*NOTE: Answer questions 1 a) and b) in your math notebook. This includes your net drawings. Please make sure you are using a ruler while drawing your nets.

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Math Unit 1: Data Management:

During this unit students will:

• Collect and organize categorical, discrete, or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data using charts and graphs, including circle frequency tables with intervals, circle graphs, histograms, and scatter plots;

• Apply a variety of data management tools and strategies to make convincing arguments about data.

How you will be assessed during this unit

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Friday, September 22, 2017

Positive and Negative Correlation

Positive Correlation: A positive correlation is a relationship between two variables such that their values increase or decrease together.

Negative Correlation: As the value of one variable increases, the other decreases.

Important Note: There’s a common tendency to think that correlation between variables means that one causes or influences the change in the other one. However, correlation does not imply causation. There may be an unknown factor that influences both variables similarly.

Task: Use the primary data we collected yesterday that explored how many push-ups and mountain climbers room 16 students can do in 30 seconds. Remember to include labels, a title and a trend line. Also, label whether there is a positive, negative or no co-relation.

Math Journal Questions (remember to record the question inside your journal):

  1. Was there positive correlation, negative correlation or no correlation between how many mountain climbers and how many push-ups students can do in 30 seconds?   Tell me how you know which correlation it is.
  2. What are two other exercises that might have a positive correlation?

Homework

Create a scatter plot using the below secondary data.

Scatter Plot Data

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Scatter Plots and Trend Lines

Scatter Plot: This is used to show the relationship between variables. A symbol, usually a dot is used to show a data pair.

Begin by watching this video and reading this news story: Canada’s Garbage Production (2013).

Review the data found at the below links:

First, organize the data into a three column table.

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Next, use this data to create a scatter plot. Below is an example of what you scatter plot might look like.

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Finally, watch the above video about scatter plots and draw a trend line for your scatter plot.

All these steps need to be completed by tomorrow.

FYI: Below are photos of what the compost bin and  and recycling containers currently look like in the lunch room. Hmmmmm? I wonder if we can do better than this at Orde Street? Perhaps there is a community agreement we can come up with?

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Room 16: Mean, Median and Mode Primary Data

Survey question: How many “mountain climbers” can you do in 30 seconds?

19, 21, 20, 20, 29, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 23, 24, 18, 16, 21, 14, 25, 24, 24, 32, 33, 25, 21, 24, 32, 33, 34, 33, 35, 27.

Mean =

Median = 

Mode =

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Mean, Median and Mode

*Record the following definitions into your math notebook.

Mean: The sum of a set of numbers divided by the number of numbers in the set.

Median: The middle value in a set of ordered data; when there is an even number of numbers, the median is the mean of the two middle numbers.

Mode: The number that occurs most often in a set of data; there can be more than one mode or there might be no mode.

Task: Answer questions 4, 5, 6 and 10 in your math notebook. Whatever is not completed will be homework.

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Monday, September 18, 2017

Frequency Tables and Stem-And-Leaf Plots

*Record the following definitions into your math notebook.

Frequency Table: A count of each item, organized by categories or intervals.

Stem-and-Leaf Plot: An organization of numerical data into categories based on place values; the digits representing greater values are the stems, and the other digits are the leaves.

Interval: The space between two values; for example, 0–9 represents the interval from 0 to 9, including 0 and 9.

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Task

  1. Organize the data for standing long jumps in a frequency table.
  2. Organize the data using a steam-and-leaf plot.

    3. Complete the following reflection in your Math Journal:

    a) How is a stem-and-leaf plot like a frequency table?
    b) When making a frequency table, stem-and-leaf plot, or bar graph, how do you choose appropriate intervals?

    Thursday, September 14, 2017

Today, you will be completing this cooperative learning problem solving challenge in groups of two. You will be completing your work neatly and on chart paper. You will be assessed on your ability to organize primary data using a frequency chart and to display it by creating a histogram.

  1. Begin by clicking on this link.
  2. Organize the data using a frequency table. You will decide whether to use intervals of 5 or 10.
  3. Draw a histogram to display your data. Make sure you include labels and a title.
  4. At the bottom of your chart paper you will.
    1. Explain how you chose your intervals.
    2. Pose data gathering question for you fellow classmates to answer.
  5. You have 25 minutes to complete this task.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

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Histograms

Definition: A histogram is a connected bar graph that shows data organized into intervals.

Three Things to Know:

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  • Now it’s your turn to make a histogram.
  • You will ONLY be completing c) and d)  of question 1.
  • After that, answer the questions below in your math journal.

1)

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NOTE: Before creating your histogram, you will need to create this frequency table.

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Math Journal Questions

  1. How are a histogram and a bar graph similar?
  2. How are they different? (You may create a Venn diagram if you like).

Monday, September 11, 2017

Part 1

First: Read this news story: The cost of fleeing your home during a hurricane

Next: Create a table that categorizes how a family might spend $2898 while living one week away from home during a hurricane. You need a minimum of four categories.

Part 2

First: Create this chart in your notebook.

Then: Construct a circle graph displaying how much money you believe was spent in each category. Make sure your graph includes a title and labelled sections with percentages. Also, each section should be a different colour.

Finally: Answer these two questions in your math journal.

  1. What are three facts displayed in your graph?
  2. Who might find this information useful or even take advantage of this information? Explain your thinking.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Displaying Data Using a Circle Graph

Click here to see how to organize data for the purpose of creating a circle graph.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Review:

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Lesson #1: Conducting a survey

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*NOTE: Below this point is math work from previous years.

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Math Chapter 1: Factors and Exponents

During this chapter, you will be able to:

  • determine factors, greatest common factors, multiples, and least common multiples of whole numbers.
  • use exponents to show repeated multiplication.
  • calculate square roots of perfect squares.
  • use order of operations with whole numbers.
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Friday, March 1st, 2013

Angle Problem Solving

Review of corresponding angles

With a learning partner you will:

 With a learning partner you will develop a solution on chart paper, with pictures, numbers and words that will help determine the solution to question 13 and 15. Also, remember to:

  • Write down the entire question at the top of your page.

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Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Lesson 7.2 Intersecting Lines, parallel liens and, Transversals

The focus of our lesson today will be:Identify and apply the relationships between the measures of angles formed by intersecting lines.

This image is a map of which Canadian city?

Answer: Toronto, of course!

Click on this link to download PDF. Write down all highlighted definitions in your text book. Also, read prompts A to G.

Homework and In Class Work: Complete questions 4 to 8 and 11.

1

2

Review of corresponding angles

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Lesson 7.1 Angle Properties of Intersecting Lines

(Remember to bring your protractor to math class)

(Remember to review ways of classifying triangles)

The focus of our lesson today will be: Identifying and calculating complementary, supplementary, and opposite angles.

Learning about complementary and supplementary angles

Learning about opposite angles

Read page 272 and 273 from your Math Makes Sense Textbook to further your understanding of these new math concepts.

Homework: Create and complete the two below tables.

Preview of “www.mathworksheets4kids....mplement-supplement.pdf” (dragged)After completing chart, click here for answers

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Intro to Angles and Triangles

NM8SB336 (dragged)

In class work and homework: Question 2 on the back of Lost Hiker handout.

Wednesday, February 2oth, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Learning Partner Problem Solving – Surface Area

A company is ordering paper to use as labels for their cans of tennis balls. The cans are cylinder shaped and have a radius of 4 centimeters and a height of 5 centimeters. The paper for the labels costs 0.006 dollars per centimeters squared. How much does the company need to spend to have labels for 500 cans ?

Problem Solving:  With a learning partner you will develop a solution on chart paper, with pictures, numbers and words that will help determine the solution to the below question. Also, remember to:

  • Write down the question at the top of your page
  • Use the two-part sentence starter: To determine … I will …
  • Finish your solution with a “Therefore statement”

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Learning Partner Problem Solving – Volume

Problem Solving:  With a learning partner you will develop a solution on chart paper, with pictures, numbers and words that will help determine the solution to the below question. Also, remember to:

  • Write down the question at the top of your page
  • Use the two-part sentence starter: To determine … I will …
  • Finish your solution with a “Therefore statement”
Question: Which has the greater volume?
  • a piece of paper rolled into a cylinder lengthwise, or
  • the same piece of paper rolled into a cylinder width wise.

Monday, February 11th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Surface Area of a Cylinder

VERY IMPORTANT FORMULA:

Problem Solving:  With a learning partner you will develop a solution on chart paper, with pictures, numbers and words that will help determine the surface area of the below container. Also, please remember to do the following:

  • Write down the question at the top of your page
  • Use the two-part sentence starter: To determine … I will …
  • Finish your solution with a “Therefore statement”

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Monday’s in Class Work (Due Wednesday, Feb. 13)Math Makes Sense Textbook, Page 260, Questions 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Surface Area of a Cylinder

1

In class work and homework:


1

2

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Volume of Cylinder

Lesson Focus: Develop and apply a formula for calculating the volume of a cylinder.

1.1

Problem Solving Question: Mr. Wass has a cylinder partially filled with jelly beans. The class may ask him four questions about the jelly beans and/or the cylinder. After, each learning partner group needs to develop a solution on chart paper, with pictures, numbers and words that will help determine how many jelly beans there are in the cylinder. The group closest to calculating the actually number of jelly beans wins a cylinder filled with deliciousness!

Homework and In Class Work:

Questions: 1, 5, 7 & 8.

  1.  

1

2

HOW TO CONVERT CUBED CM TO MILLITRES

3

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Volume of Cylinder

Important Formula:

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2

Homework: Page 255, Question 1.

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Working Backwards to Calculate Radius and Diameter

Question 8, Page 251

8) The bottom of a swimming pool is a circle with a circumference 31.4 m. What is the area of the bottom of the pool? Give the answer to the nearest square meter.

8) a) What is the area of the bottom of the pool if the Circumference is 40 metres?

Review questions

Round your answers to one decimal place.

1) Calculate the radius and circumference of a circle with diameter of 20 cm.

2) Calculate the diameter and circumference of a frisbee with radius of 10 cm.

3) Calculate the diameter and circumference of a circle with radius of 15 cm.

Additional Review

Page 252, Questions 1, 2, 5 and 9.

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Calculating Circumference and Area

Homework and in class work

  • Questions: 2, 3 and 5 a) on page 250 of Math Makes Sense textbook.

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Learning Partner Problem Solving

Today you will be solving two problem solving questions with your learning partner. Remember to include the following in your solutions (if you were absent on Wednesday, Jan. 23, please answer both questions in your textbook):

  1. A “To determine the … I will …” statement.
  2. Pictures and numbers.
  3. A “Therefore statement”

1

2

 

 

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Calculating the Area of a Circle

Formula for Calculating the Area of Circle:

In class work and homework:

Answer questions 4 to 8.

1

Question 8

2

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Exploring the Area of a Circle

Click here to access the textbook pages from today’s lesson.

Formula for Calculating the Area of Circle:

Formula for Finding a Circumference:

C = 2r  and  C = d

1

2

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Lesson 3 – Calculating Circumference 

Formula for Finding a Circumference:

C = 2r  and  C = d

1

2

Below is the in-class work and homework

3

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Lesson 2 – Discovering Pi

 (pi): the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle; its value is 3.141 592 654 …, or about 3.14, rounded to two decimal places.

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Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Measurement of Circles: Lesson 1

Key Definitions:

  1. Radius (plural = radii): a line segment that goes from the centre of a circle to its circumference; the length of this line segment.
  2. Diameter: a line segment that runs from one side of a circle, through the centre, to the other side; the length of this line segment.
  3. Circumference: the boundary of a circle; the length of this boundary.
  4. Arc: a section of the circumference of a circle that lies between two ends of a chord (each chord creates two arcs); the length of this section.
  5. Chord: a line segment that joins any two points on the circumference of a circle; the length of this line segment.

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Friday, January 11th, 2013

Reading Circle Graphs

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1) True or False: 
Music is heard more than twice as much as Sports and Commercials are during one hour of radio time.

2) What percentage of radio time consists of D.J. talk, news and commercials during one hour of radio?

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Data Management: Group Problem Solving

math-074395-File3of5 (dragged)

Monday, January 7th, 2013

Data Management 5.6: Mean, Median, Mode and Range

Lesson Focus: Use means, medians, modes and ranges to compare groups of data.

Key Definitions:

Mean: The sum of a set of numbers divided by the number of numbers in the set.
Solution Strategy: The “Mean” is computed by adding all of the numbers in the data together and dividing by the number elements contained in the data set.

Median: The middle number when data are arranged in numerical order; if there is an even number of data, the median is the mean of the two middle numbers.
Solution Strategy: First reorder the data set from the smallest to the largest then if the number of elements are odd, then the Median is the element in the middle of the data set. If the number of elements are even, then the Median is the average of the two middle terms.

Mode: The number that occurs most often in a set of numbers.
Important Info: It is not uncommon for a data set to have more than one mode. This happens when two or more elements occur with equal frequency in the data set. A data set with two modes is called bimodal. A data set with three modes is called trimodal.

Range: The difference between the greatest and least numbers in a set of data.
Solution Strategy:  First, reorder the data set from smallest to largest then subtract the first element from the last element.

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Wednesday, Dec. 12th, 2012

Data Management 5.5: Drawing Histograms

Bar Graph: a graph used to represent measurements, or numbers, of different items. Then, the items are compared. Each bar in the graph is separated by a space. The length or height of each bar representsa number.

Histogram: a graph used when we have a large amount of data where the numbers can be arranged in numerical order when grouped.

math-074395-File3of5 (dragged)

In-class and homework: Questions 1,2 and 3.

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Tuesday, Dec. 11th, 2012

Data Management 5.2: Inferring and Evaluating

In class work and homework: Page 197, Questions: 2 to 4.

math-074395-File3of5 (dragged)

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Monday, Dec. 10th, 2012

Data Management 5.2: Inferring and Evaluating

Inference Definition: A conclusion drawn from data.  When we use data to predict a value in the future, or to estimate a value between given data,we make an inference. When we use data to make a conclusion,we infer.

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In class work and homework: 

  1. Using the data from Population in Thousands worksheet table, create a population pyramid for the country you group has selected. Remember the male and female sides of the graph need to be different colours.
  2. Write down and answer the below inference questions directly below your population pyramid.
  • If you had a business and wanted to capitalize on your information about the population age distribution of your country, what would you sell?

Homework: Page 196, Question 1.

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Friday, Nov. 30th, 2012

Data Management Census-Taking 

  • Today we will be filling out Census survey and completing the student worksheet.

Thursday, Nov. 29th, 2012

Lesson 5.1 A: Evaluating Bias 

Focus: How to evaluate whether a sampling method provides biased data.

Random Sample: A random sample is a sample in which each individual or object in the population has an equal chance of being selected.

In class work and Homework: Page 191 Questions 6 and 7.

Tuesday, Nov. 27th, 2012

Lesson 5.1: Relating Census and Sample

Focus: Collect data from a population and a sample.

In class work and Homework: Read pages 187 to 189 in your Math Makes Sense Textbook. Answer questions 1 to 5 on pages 189-190.

NOTE: Each of your answers should be written in complete sentences.

Thursday, Nov. 21st, 2012

Triangular Prism Problem Solving

The measurements for the Toblerone Bar are: Base = 4 cm; Height = 3 cm; Length = 21 cm

Question: The foil used to wrap the Toblerone bar cost 0.08 cents for each square centrimetre and the cardboard for the outside package cost 0.12 cents per square centrimetre. Find the total cost of the packaging for a crate of 15 dozen bars.

BONUS: Calculate the Volume of the Toblerone bar.

Tuesday, Nov. 20th, 2012

Lesson 3.4: Volume of a Triangular Prism

Focus: Develop and use a formula for finding the volume of a triangular prism.

Do you remember how to calculate the volume of a rectangular prism:

Formula for calculating the area of a triangular prims:

In-class and Homework Questions:

  • Page 119-120, Questions 1, 2, 3 and 5.

Thursday, Nov. 15th, 2012

Rectangular Prism Problem Solving

You will begin your problem solving solution with a “to determine” statement. You will use the phrase “to determine” to introduce the strategy you will be using to solve the math problem.

Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012

Lesson 3.3: Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

Focus: Develop a formula for finding the surface area of a triangular prism.

To find the area of a triangular prism, we use the formula:

How to find the Surface Area of a Triangular Prism

What does the Net of a Triangular Prism look like?

In-class work and homework: Page 115, Questions: 1, 2 and 3

Monday, Nov. 12, 2012

Geometry and Measurement: Calculate the Area of a Triangle
and Converting Among Units of Measure

Finding the Area of a Triangle

To find the area of a triangle, we use the formula: Area = 1/2(base x height) or 1/2bh
is the length of the base and  is corresponding height.

Converting Among Units of Measure

Metric Conversion Rap

Draw this Resource!


Online Resource for Converting Units of Measure: CLICK HERE

In-class work and homework

  • Textbook: Page 100, Question 4 and Page 101, Question 5. Textbook questions will no longer be available online. You must bring textbook home. This is an important learning skill for you to practice.
  • Complete Math Journal Reflection: How do I calculate the area of a triangle? How do I convert among units of measure?

Friday, Nov. 9, 2012

Geometry and Measurement: Skills You’ll Need

How to Calculate the Surface Area of a Rectangular Prism

How to Find the Volume of a Rectangular Prism

In-Class and Homework Questions

  • Page 98, Question 3.

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012

Intro to Unit 3: Geometry and Measurement

Problem Solving Success Criteria

  • Listen closely and record the problem solving question after watching video twice.
  • Assume one of three roles in group: recorder, materials organizer and presenter.
  • All group members are engaged and assist in solution of problem solving question.
  • Your group’s volume does not distract others (Mr. Wass does not have to ask you to quiet down).
  • Show your work so that it is easily understood by anyone familiar or unfamiliar with comparing unit rates.
  • Have a concluding statement.
  • Practice and then clearly present your solution.
  • Get the answer right!

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012

Unit 3: Geometry and Measurement Definitions

Surface Area: The surface area of a rectangular prism is the sum of the areas of all its faces. Since opposite faces are congruent, this formula can be used to find the surface area: 2 x area of base + 2 x area of side face+ 2 x area of front face.

Volume: The volume of a rectangular prism is the space occupied by the prism. One formula for the volume is: Volume = area of base x height.

Monday, Nov. 2, 2012

Problem Solving Friday: Sales Discount and Tax

Focus: How to calculate a discount and add the sales tax

In-class and homework: page 79 Questions 1, 2 and 7.

Friday, Nov. 2, 2012

Problem Solving Friday: Comparing Unit Rates

At Sobeys’ a 6-pack of juice costs $3.99. A 12 pack of juice costs $5.99. Geoffrey and Julia need to buy 58 juice boxes. What is the least expensive way to do this? What do the 58 juice boxes cost? Show your work and justify your answer.

Problem Solving Success Criteria

  • Assume one of three roles in group: recorder, materials organizer and presenter.
  • All group members are engaged and assist in solution of problem solving question.
  • Your group’s volume does not distract others (Mr. Wass does not have to ask you to quiet down).
  • Show your work so that it is easily understood by anyone familiar or unfamiliar with comparing unit rates.
  • Have a concluding statement.
  • Practice and then clearly present your solution.
  • Get the answer right!

Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

Lesson 2.4: Calculating Percents
Focus: Calculating percents from less than 1 percent to greater than 100%. How do you Calculate Percentage in Mathematics?

In-class and homework: page 72, questions 1, 2, 4 and 5.

Watch this video for further re-enforcement about how to calculate percent in a variety of situations.

Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012

Lesson 2.3 Continued: Comparing Rates Problem Solving Question

Mr. Wass, Myles and Caleb each think they are the fastest person at Earl Grey. i) Mr. Wass can run 60 km in 3 hours ii) Myles can run 68 km in 4 hours iii)Caleb can run 70km in 5 hours

  • Who runs at the greatest average speed?
  • Draw a graph to illustrate your answers.

 

Monday, Oct. 29, 2012

Lesson 2.3: Comparing Rates

Key Math Learning: We use unit rates to compare rates.

  • Read over with elbow partner(s) and answer below to questions.

  • Read over Connect question and solution.

  • In class work and homework: page 67, questions 1 and 2.

Lesson Reminder

Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012

Lesson 2.2: Scale Drawings

What is a Scale Drawing?

Scale Drawing: It is a picture of an object where the lengths on the picture are greater than or less than lengths on the object.

Word Problem: A square field has an edge length of 275 metres. Choose a scale. Make a scale drawing of the field. Justify your answer.

Homework

  • Page 60, Questions 4 and 8.

New Daily Math Groups: Please sit beside your new group members

Group 1: Brittany, Whitney, Astra         Group 2: Steven, Chris, Geoffrey

Group 3: Seneca, Abdullah, Wallace     Group 4: Liam, Myles, Luck Group 5: Stephanie, Shy, Bridget          Group 6: Julia, Yasmine, Fatimah Group 7: Don, Tyri, Rowland                  Group 8: Caleb, Dash, Fallon Group 9: Futian, Clarissa, Iman

Friday, Oct. 19, 2012

Proportional Problem Solving Review

Question: At Earl Grey, 45 students take piano lessons. The ratio of the numbers of students who take piano lessons to violin lessons is 15 to 8. The ratio of the numbers of students who take violin lessons to clarinet lessons is 8 to 9. You must answer two questions this time: a) How many students take violin lessons? b) How many students take clarinet lessons? Success Criteria

  • Assume one of three roles in group: recorder, materials organizer and presenter.
  • All group members are engaged and assist in solution of problem solving question.
  • Your group’s volume does not distract others (Mr. Wass does not have to ask you to quiet down).
  • Show your work so that it is easily understood by anyone familiar or unfamiliar with this proportional word problems.
  • Have a concluding statement.
  • Practice and then clearly present your solution.
  • Get the answer right!

Review of steps for solving proportion word problems:

Homework

  • Question 8 on page 56 (see blow).
  • Review questions and videos from last four days. Complete all unfinished homework. This will be assessed during tomorrow’s quiz.

8. Last week, Marcia played goal keeper for her hockey team. She stopped 20 out of 30 shots on goal. This week, Marcia faced 36 shots. She stopped shots on goal in the same ratio as the previous week. How many shots did Marcia stop? Bonus Review: a) Silva and Renate were given money in the Ratio of 5 to 3. Silva’s share was $60. How much did Renate receive? b) At the 2004 Athens Olympics, the ratio of Canada’s gold medals to Greece’s gold medals was 1:2. Together, Canada and Greece won 9 gold medals. i) How many gold medals did Canada win? ii)How many gold medals did Greece win?

Friday, Oct. 19, 2012

Lesson 2.1: Continued

Proportional Problem Solving

Question: At the annual Earl Grey Grade 8 ski trip,for every 2 students who skied, 3 snowboarded. Ninety-six students snowboarded. How many students skied?

Success Criteria

  • Assume one of three roles in group: recorder, materials organizer and presenter.
  • Assist in solution of problem solving question.
  • Show your work so that it is easily understood by anyone familiar or unfamiliar with this proportional word problems.
  • Have a concluding statement.
  • Practice and then clearly present your solution.
  • Get the answer right!

Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012

Lesson 2.1: Using Proportions to Solve Ratio Problems

What is a proportion?

Proportion: a number sentence that shows two equivalent ratios; for example, 1: 2 : 3 = 3 : 6 : 9.

Using cross-multiplication to solve proportions?

Another way to solve proportions:

Need further re-enforcement? Watch video below:

Now check your understanding. Answer Questions 1 -3 on page 55.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012

Rate, Ratio and Percent: Skills You Need

What is a Ratio

Ratio: a comparison of two quantities measured in the same unit.

How do we write a ratio in simplest form?

Now check your understanding. With a partner, answer questions 1 and 2 on page 50.

The difference between a Rate and Unit Rate:

Rate:  a comparison of two quantities measuredin different units. Unit Rate: a rate that has a denominator of 1 unit.

How do we change a rate to a unit rate?

Now check your understanding. Answer Question 3 on page 52.

Relating Fractions, Decimals and Percents

Now check your understanding. Answer Question 5 on page 52.

Homework: Complete questions 1, 2, 3 and 5 in your Math Notebook (page 50 to 52). Remember our Notebook Success Criteria.

Monday, Oct. 15, 2012

Quiz Review: Expressing Fractions as Decimals and Multiplying and Dividing Decimals

1. Use prime factorization to determine if  61/90 has a repeating decimal equivalent. Use a calculator to check your prediction. Show your work.

2. Which is the smallest fraction 2/5, 2/7, 3/4, 2/3 or  5/6. Show your work.

3. In the product 3.7 x 7.8 = 2886, where should the decimal be placed? Show your work.

4. In the quotient 18.6 ÷ 13.2 = 140909, where should the decimal be placed? Show your work.

5. Barack works 8 hours on Saturday and is paid $10.75 an hour. How much money did she on Saturday? Show your work. Include a therefore sign (∴) at the beginning of your concluding statement.

6. Mitt drove his car at a speed of 92 km/h. How far did he travel in 3.2 hours? Show your work. Include a therefore sign (∴) at the beginning of your concluding statement.

Friday, Oct. 12, 2012

Lesson 2.2: Multiplying and Dividing Decimals

Lesson Goal: Understand and apply multiplication and division of decimals.

Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012

Lesson 2.2: Multiplying and Dividing Decimals

Lesson Goal: Understand and apply multiplication and division of decimals.

Whole class discussion: In Canada, most part-time job wages are set as an hourly rate. Does anyone in the class have a part-time job? What is the minimum wage in Ontario? How would we calculate the amount that someone would earn in one 8-hour day of work?

Today’s Math Questions

Wednesday, Oct, 10, 2012

Lesson 2.1: Expressing Fractions as Decimals-Problem Solving

Tuesday, Oct, 9, 2012

Lesson 2.1: Expressing Fractions as Decimals

  • During this lesson you will learn how to use division to express fractions as decimals.

New Terms: Terminating Decimal and Repeating Decimal and Bar Notation.

Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

Quiz Review

1. Which of the following is a composite number?

a. 13 b. 18 c. 17 d. 19

2. Identify all the prime numbers between 40 and 50.

3. What is the GCF of the numbers below?

720 = 2 x 2 x 2 x 2x 3 x 3 x 5 2100 = 2 x 2 x 3 x 5 x 5 x 7

4. What is the missing number in the below prime factorization: 420 = 2 x 2 x        x 5 x 7

5. What is the LCM of the numbers below? 60 = 2 x 2 x 3 x 5 90 = 2 x 3 x 3 x 5

6.  A number in Prime Factorization is 2 x 2 x 2 x 3 x 5 x 5 x 7 x 7 x 7. Now write the number in Standard form.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012

Review:

Lesson 1.3: GCF and LCM – Part 2

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